2019 Texas Constitutional Amendments

10 state constitutional amendments will appear on the statewide ballot Nov. 5, 2020

Early Voting: October 21 – November 1

Find your polling place here: https://www.votetexas.gov/voting/where.html

Bring ID, your voter registration card or any kind of official document (a utility bill for example) with your name and address on it and a sign a form stating you had a reasonable challenge to getting an ID.

Bring your notes. You are allowed to bring written materials into your voting station to help you recall how you want to cast your ballot. All materials must be printed – phones and electronics are not permitted.

Proposition 1 (HJR 72) – For

Amendment as it will appear on the ballot: “The constitutional amendment permitting a person to hold more than one office as a municipal judge at the same time.”

What this means: HJR 72 would make it easier for smaller (often rural) municipalities find judges by allowing one person to be elected to multiple judgeships.

Proposition 2 (SJR 79) – For

Amendment as it will appear on the ballot: “The constitutional amendment providing for the issuance of additional general obligation bonds by the Texas Water Development Board in an amount not to exceed $200 million to provide financial assistance for the development of certain projects in economically distressed areas.”

What this means: SJR 79 allows the Texas Water Development Board to sell bonds to build water supply and wastewater facilities in economically distressed cities.

Proposition 3 (HJR 34) – For

Amendment as it will appear on the ballot: “The constitutional amendment authorizing the legislature to provide for a temporary exemption from ad valorem taxation of a portion of the appraised value of certain property damaged by a disaster.”

What this means: HJR 34 would allow the Legislature to temporarily lower tax rates on property damaged during a disaster.

Proposition 4 (HJR 38) – Against

Amendment as it will appear on the ballot: “The constitutional amendment prohibiting the imposition of an individual income tax, including a tax on an individual’s share of partnership and unincorporated association income.”

What this means: HJR 38 would ban the creation of a state income tax. Texas already has a prohibition on state personal income tax. HJR 38 would replace the words “natural persons” with individuals – this could create a corporate loophole.

Proposition 5 (SJR 24) – For

Amendment as it will appear on the ballot: “The constitutional amendment dedicating the revenue received from the existing state sales and use taxes that are imposed on sporting goods to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Historical Commission to protect Texas’ natural areas, water quality, and history by acquiring, managing, and improving state and local parks and historic sites while not increasing the rate of the state sales and use taxes.”

What this means: SJR 24 would require all revenue from the sporting goods sales tax to state park operators, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Historical Commission.

Proposition 6 (HJR 12) – For

Amendment as it will appear on the ballot: “The constitutional amendment authorizing the legislature to increase by $3 billion the maximum bond amount authorized for the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.”

What this means: HJR 12 would double the bonds that can be sold to the benefit of the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas to $6 billion.

Proposition 7 (HJR 151) – For

Amendment as it will appear on the ballot: “The constitutional amendment allowing increased distributions to the available school fund.”

What this means: HJR 151 would double the annual possible General Land Office distribution to the available school fund.

Proposition 8 (HJR 4) – For

Amendment as it will appear on the ballot: “The constitutional amendment providing for the creation of the flood infrastructure fund to assist in the financing of drainage, flood mitigation, and flood control projects.”

What this means: HJR 4 lets the Texas Water Development allocate dollars to a flood infrastructure fund, for local loans for planning, seeking permits for, or constructing flood-related projects.

Proposition 9 (HJR 95) – Against

Amendment as it will appear on the ballot: “The constitutional amendment authorizing the legislature to exempt from ad valorem taxation precious metal held in a precious metal depository located in this state.”

What this means: HJR 95 creates a tax exemption for precious metals held in the Texas Bullion Depository, giving a tax break to those who invest in precious metals over other investment choices.

Proposition 10 (SJR 32) – For

Amendment as it will appear on the ballot: “The constitutional amendment to allow the transfer of a law enforcement animal to a qualified caretaker in certain circumstances.”

What this means: SJR 32 would let retired police dogs and other law enforcement animals to live with their handler or other caretaker.

Additional Resources

https://www.kut.org/post/theres-election-texas-coming-here-are-constitutional-propositions-youll-vote

https://www.votetexas.gov/

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